Compostion, Angle, and Position (CAPs)

CAPs

CAPs are an advanced level of photo composition. They are used to help vary the "look and feel" of a shot, but can also be used to draw the eye or hide specific information.

Below are the 19 most commonly used CAPs and some examples.

Composition

Arrange the elements of the picture by placing specific content within the picture.

Angle

Arrange the elements by using the camera to "LOOK" in specific places.

Position

Arrange the elements by "POSITIONING" the camera in specific places.

Show All | Composition | Angle | Position
Rule of thirds (subject) - Use a grid that divides the screen into thirds vertically and horizontally. Fill one third with either sky or land to create balance.

Rule of thirds (subject) - Use a grid that divides the screen into thirds vertically and horizontally. Fill one third with either sky or land to create balance.

Rule of thirds (scenery) - Use a grid that divides the screen into thirds vertically and horizontally. Fill one third with either sky or land to create balance.

Rule of thirds (scenery) - Use a grid that divides the screen into thirds vertically and horizontally. Fill one third with either sky or land to create balance.

Leading lines - Use lines created by the world to lead the eye to the subject.

Leading lines - Use lines created by the world to lead the eye to the subject.

Repetition of shapes - Use similar shapes to create pattern, symmetry or contrast.

Repetition of shapes - Use similar shapes to create pattern, symmetry or contrast.

Contrast in content - Using colors, objects, shapes, directions that differ to draw the eye to the subject.

Contrast in content - Using colors, objects, shapes, directions that differ to draw the eye to the subject.

Unusual Angle - Put the camera at an angle that is not common.

Unusual angle - Put the camera at an angle that is not common.

Framing - Use the world to create frames for your subjects.

Framing - Use the world to create frames for your subjects.

Grouping shots - Things/people tend to end up in groups together. This is not portrait photography.

Grouping shots - Things/people tend to end up in groups together. This is not portrait photography.

Parts of a whole - Use parts of different subjects in your composition to tell the whole story.

Parts of a whole - Use parts of different subjects in your composition to tell the whole story.

Eye level - Taken from directly in front of the subject. Gives audience a feeling of being on the level of the subject.

Eye level - Taken from directly in front of the subject. Gives audience a feeling of being on the level of the subject.

Low angle - Taken from somewhat below the subject. Gives subject a sense of dominance.

Low angle - Taken from somewhat below the subject. Gives subject a sense of dominance.

High angle - Taken from somewhat above the subject. Gives subject a sense of insignificance.

High angle - Taken from somewhat above the subject. Gives subject a sense of insignificance.

Bird's Eye - Taken from directly above the subject. Gives audience a feeling of dominance.

Bird's eye - Taken from directly above the subject. Gives audience a feeling of dominance.

Ant's Eye - Taken from directly below the subject. Gives audience a feeling of insignificance.

Ant's eye - Taken from directly below the subject. Gives audience a feeling of insignificance.

Flat angle - Pictures that are flat are shot from a distance directly in front of the subject. Usually they have a solid background or wall.

Flat angle - Pictures that are flat are shot from a distance directly in front of the subject. Usually they have a solid background or wall.

Macro - Camera is placed as close to the subject as possible. Gives audience a sense of subjects world.

Macro - Camera is placed as close to the subject as possible. Gives audience a sense of subjects world.

Ground level - Camera is placed as close to the ground as possible. Gives audience a sense of subjects movement.

Ground level - Camera is placed as close to the ground as possible. Gives audience a sense of subjects movement.

Forced foreground - Camera is placed as close to the foreground object as possible. Gives audience a sense of depth.

Forced foreground - Camera is placed as close to the foreground object as possible. Gives audience a sense of depth.

Point of view - Camera is placed in the eyes of the subject. Gives audience a sense of what the subject sees.

Point of view - Camera is placed in the eyes of the subject. Gives audience a sense of what the subject sees.

Activity

Project Duration: 1 Day | Groups: 1 (max) | Media : 10 Photos | Difficulty: Beginner

Task: Compose and shoot 10 photos that demonstrate your understanding of the CAPs techniques.

Objective: Tell visual stories using various compositions, camera positions, and angles.

Example Worksheet: Click to view.